Pet Clinic Receives Gifts Worth $22,000

The Australian paddling crew, Rogz for Dogz, were on site last week to make the generous donation to The Esther Honey Foundation in their fifth consecutive year of doing it.

The Australian paddling crew, Rogz for Dogz, were on site last week to make the generous donation to The Esther Honey Foundation in their fifth consecutive year of doing it. Cook Islands News photo.

Cook Islands News
December 8, 2012

Esther Honey Foundation (EHF) director Gregg Young is hailing the recent food and equipment donation valued at over $22,000 made by Australian paddling crew Rogz for Dogz.

The group donated a large stockpile of food, equipment and medical supplies worth nearly $22,713, not $7100 as reported in last Saturday’s Cook Islands News.

The Australian crew were on site last week to make the generous donation to the charity in their fifth consecutive year of doing it.

Young says the donation of $4100 of pet food will see them through until next year.

“We normally spend between $200 and $300 a week in food so that’s going to be a great saving for us,” says Young.

“This amount of food is so big that we had to get storage off site as well for all the extra supplies.”

The group, which participated in the open mixed Round Raro Relay Race, spent time visiting companies and vets asking for any collars, leads, and extra items.

Klik Systems Australia fronted up with a massive $3800 donation to help the group buy food at CITC’s main store in Avarua.

“CITC sold it to them at wholesale and they got full value for their buck.”

A number of organisations jumped on board, including Australian company Rogz, who donated 235 leads and collars to the value of over $7000.

Merial, Bayer, CC’s Bargains, Pet Biz, Petstock Ulladulla and The Reject Shop in Ulladulla also pitched in with sizeable contributions.

Casey’s Beach vet, Ulladulla vet and Milton vet also came to the party – as did the RSPCA’s head office vet in Sydney.

While leads and collars are now in stock, the pet clinic also received a number of much-needed drugs, muzzles and toys for animals.

Young admits he is surprised by how much they brought over – “and I’m surprised at how useful it all is”.

“Sometimes we get supplies and we’re not sure if we’re going to use them or not, but most of the things they brought are things that we actually really need.”

The biggest spinoff for the organisation was the money saved by not needing to buy food for the animals.

However, the extra funds are likely to go directly into more drugs for the animals as the clinic is seeing an increase in the number of animals needing treatment at the clinic.

EHF sees on average between 250 and 300 animals for a variety of things, including spaying and neutering, as well as accident and emergency treatment.

While it is a time of receiving for the clinic, Young adds he has some kittens and puppies he is looking to adopt out to loving homes.

Those interested can contact Young at the clinic.

- Matiu Workman

Tags: